Category Archives: Eucharistic Sacrifice

The “Protty” Jesus

We agree with Mr. Voris when he says that Roman Catholics worship a different god.
We agree with Mr. Voris when he says that Roman Catholics worship a different god.

The Vortex is a video production of the Roman Catholic ministry called Church Militant, operated by Michael Voris. In his short eight-minute video from May 23, Mr. Voris briefly introduces, and then immediately sets aside, the question of whether Christians and Muslims worship the same God. He does this in order to address what he believes to be a much more pressing question: “Do Protestants and Catholics worship the same Jesus?” His refreshingly honest conclusion is, “Nope,” and such refreshing honesty finds a very welcome reception here at Out of His Mouth. We agree with him. Continue reading The “Protty” Jesus

The ‘Certainty’ of ‘Cumulative Probability’

According to Roman Catholicism, Jesus founded His Church upon a cumulative probability of zero.
If Maurice de la Taille is right, then Jesus founded His Church upon a cumulative probability of zero.

Those who have read our recent article, Melito’s Sacrifice, or last year’s Removing Jesus, are by now familiar with the Roman Catholic propensity for moving Jesus’ sacrifice back to Thursday night at the Last Supper. Rome’s sacrifice of the Mass is ostensibly grounded in Jesus’ institution of the Lord’s Supper, and because Roman Catholicism considers the Mass to be a sacrifice, her apologists are ever eager to turn the Last Supper into a sacrifice of Jesus’ body and blood. As we have noted, apologist Art Sippo says “The Last Supper was the real sacrificial offering of Christ for sin” (Catholic Legate, Q&A on the Sacraments), and apologist Scott Hahn says “Jesus’ institution of the Holy Eucharist was nothing less than the sacrifice of the New Covenant Passover” (Scott Hahn, The Bible and the Sacrifice of the Mass, 9:00-9:10).

The Roman Catholic mass sacrifice is essentially meaningless if Rome cannot prove that Jesus actually sacrificed His body and blood on Thursday night. One of the main points in Hahn’s talk on the sacrifice of the Mass was that he did not finally understand this concept until he read the 2nd century work, Peri Pascha, by Melito of Sardis. Yet when one reads Melito’s Peri Pascha, there is simply no reference to a Thursday sacrifice. Every reference to Jesus’ sacrifice in Peri Pascha is a reference to the cross. What we found with Hahn we have found to be typical of Roman apologists—they must first read their beliefs into the Early Church first in order to get the Early Church to reflect their beliefs. Continue reading The ‘Certainty’ of ‘Cumulative Probability’

Melito’s Sacrifice

For all of his hand waving, Scott Hahn cannot get Melito of Sardis to move Jesus' sacrifice back to Thursday.
For all of his hand waving, Scott Hahn cannot get Melito of Sardis to move Jesus’ sacrifice back in time to Thursday evening.

One of the more curious implications of the Roman Catholic sacrifice of the Mass is that Jesus actually did not offer Himself as a sacrifice on the cross. Instead, they say, He offered Himself as a sacrifice at the Last Supper. For example, Roman Catholic apologist Art Sippo at the Catholic Legate, explains:

“The Last Supper was the real sacrificial offering of Christ for sin and it certainly was unbloody. Without the Last Supper I defy you to find any reference to the Body and Blood of Christ being offered as a sacrifice for sin in the entire of the Passion Narratives. Christ did not offer his body and blood to God during the passion.” (Catholic Legate, Q&A on the Sacraments)

As we showed in week 8 of our series, Their Praise was their Sacrifice, this concept of the Last Supper as a sacrifice came late in time, and actually originated in the latter part of the 4th century when Gregory of Nyssa was trying to calculate the three days between Jesus’ death and his resurrection. In his 382 A.D. oration, On the Space of Three Days between the Death and the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, Gregory of Nyssa got creative in his analysis of Matthew 12:40, which says that “the Son of man” must “be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.” By Gregory’s reckoning, he could only account for two.
Continue reading Melito’s Sacrifice

Their Praise was their Sacrifice (part 7)

The Early Church understood praise, not the Lord’s Supper, to be the sacrifice of the New Covenant (Hebrews 13:15).
The Early Church understood praise, not the Lord’s Supper, to be the sacrifice of the New Covenant (Hebrews 13:15).

We continue this week with our analysis of Malachi 1:11 as understood by the Early Church. This series is a response to The Sacrifice Challenge, a challenge issued by Roman Catholic apologists who believe that the only possible fulfillment of Malachi 1:11 is Roman Catholicism’s sacrifice of the Mass. The Early Church, however, saw the sacrifice and incense of Malachi 1:11 to be “simple prayer from a pure conscience,” not a sacrifice of bread and wine. Continue reading Their Praise was their Sacrifice (part 7)

Their Praise was their Sacrifice (part 6)

The Early Church understood praise, not the Lord’s Supper, to be the sacrifice of the New Covenant (Hebrews 13:15).
The Early Church understood praise, not the Lord’s Supper, to be the sacrifice of the New Covenant (Hebrews 13:15).

We continue this week with our analysis of Malachi 1:11 as understood by the Early Church. This series is a response to The Sacrifice Challenge, a challenge issued by Roman Catholic apologists who believe that the only possible fulfillment of Malachi 1:11 is Roman Catholicism’s sacrifice of the Mass. The Early Church, however, saw the sacrifice and incense of Malachi 1:11 to be “simple prayer from a pure conscience,” not a sacrifice of bread and wine. Continue reading Their Praise was their Sacrifice (part 6)

Their Praise was their Sacrifice (part 5)

The Early Church understood praise, not the Lord’s Supper, to be the sacrifice of the New Covenant (Hebrews 13:15).
The Early Church understood praise, not the Lord’s Supper, to be the sacrifice of the New Covenant (Hebrews 13:15).

We continue this week with our analysis of Malachi 1:11 as understood by the Early Church. This series is a response to The Sacrifice Challenge, a challenge issued by Roman Catholic apologists who believe that the only possible fulfillment of Malachi 1:11 is Roman Catholicism’s sacrifice of the Mass. The Early Church, however, saw the sacrifice and incense of Malachi 1:11 to be “simple prayer from a pure conscience,” not a sacrifice of bread and wine. Continue reading Their Praise was their Sacrifice (part 5)

Their Praise was their Sacrifice (part 4)

The Early Church understood praise, not the Lord’s Supper, to be the sacrifice of the New Covenant (Hebrews 13:15).
The Early Church understood praise, not the Lord’s Supper, to be the sacrifice of the New Covenant (Hebrews 13:15).

We continue this week with our analysis of Malachi 1:11 as understood by the Early Church. This series is a response to The Sacrifice Challenge, a challenge issued by Roman Catholic apologists who believe that the only possible fulfillment of Malachi 1:11 is Roman Catholicism’s sacrifice of the Mass. The Early Church, however, saw the sacrifice and incense of Malachi 1:11 to be “simple prayer from a pure conscience,” not a sacrifice of bread and wine. Continue reading Their Praise was their Sacrifice (part 4)

Their Praise was Their Sacrifice (part 3)

The Early Church understood praise, not the Lord's Supper, to be the sacrifice of the New Covenant (Hebrews 13:15).
The Early Church understood praise, not the Lord’s Supper, to be the sacrifice of the New Covenant (Hebrews 13:15).

We continue this week with our analysis of Malachi 1:11 as understood by the Early Church. This series is a response to The Sacrifice Challenge, a challenge issued by Roman Catholic apologists who believe that the only possible fulfillment of Malachi 1:11 is Roman Catholicism’s sacrifice of the Mass. The Douay Catechism, as well as many Roman Catholic apologists, holds that “All the … Fathers, … of the primitive ages, teach that the mass is the self same sacrifice of bread and wine that had been instituted by our Saviour,” and is the fulfillment of Malachi’s prophecy that “in every place incense shall be offered unto my name, and a pure offering.” As we have demonstrated in the last two weeks, Rome’s claims are wholly inconsistent with the data. Rather, the Early Church saw the sacrifice and incense of Malachi 1:11 to be “simple prayer from a pure conscience.” Continue reading Their Praise was Their Sacrifice (part 3)

Their Praise was their Sacrifice (part 2)

The Early Church understood praise, not the Lord's Supper, to be the sacrifice of the New Covenant (Hebrews 13:15).
The Early Church understood praise, not the Lord’s Supper, to be the sacrifice of the New Covenant (Hebrews 13:15).

In our introduction to this series last week, we accepted The Sacrifice Challenge, which is a gauntlet, as it were, that has been thrown down by Roman Catholics who believe that the “incense” and “pure offering” of Malachi 1:11 can only refer to the Roman Catholic sacrifice of the Mass. “All the … Fathers … of the primitive ages, teach,” says the Douay Catechism, “that the mass is the self same sacrifice of bread and wine” to which Malachi referred. According to the Douay Catechism, the Sacrifice of the Mass (in which the bread and wine are transubstantiated into the body and blood of Christ and then offered as a sacrifice to God for our sins) is the “pure offering” prophesied by Malachi. Continue reading Their Praise was their Sacrifice (part 2)

Their Praise was their Sacrifice (part 1)

“By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name.” — Hebrews 13:15

As we explained several months ago in our entry, In Vain Do They Worship Me, Roman Catholics worship the elements of the Lord’s Supper, and because the bread of the Lord’s supper remains bread throughout, we do not hesitate to call our Roman Catholic acquaintances—and yes, even this writer’s own Roman Catholic family members—”bread worshipers.” This term is considered offensive to Roman Catholics but we do not shy away from it. As the Scripture says,

“he maketh it a graven image, and falleth down thereto, …he falleth down unto it, and worshippeth it, and prayeth unto it, and saith, ‘Deliver me; for thou art my god.’ … a deceived heart hath turned him aside, that he cannot deliver his soul, nor say, ‘Is there not a lie in my right hand?'” (Isaiah 44:15-20)

The “bread god” in the priest’s right hand is a lie, and we will no more demur from calling the idol what it is than we will demur from preaching the Gospel, which is equally offensive to them. Much more offensive to us is their insistence that we join them in worshiping the work of their hands. The world cannot be fully converted, they say, until all men bend the knee to their bread idol. Continue reading Their Praise was their Sacrifice (part 1)